In the News
6 Tips For Better Work-Life Balance
6 Tips For Better Work-Life Balance

Forbes

A lot of overachievers develop perfectionist tendencies at a young age when demands on their time are limited to school, hobbies and maybe an after-school job. It’s easier to maintain that perfectionist habit as a kid, but as you grow up, life gets more complicated. As you climb the ladder at work and as your family grows, your responsibilities mushroom. Perfectionism becomes out of reach, and if that habit is left unchecked, it can become destructive, says executive coach Marilyn Puder-York, PhD, who wrote The Office Survival Guide.

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AOL Boss Blew it in Public Firing
AOL Boss Blew it in Public Firing

Special to CNN
By Marilyn Puder-York

On Friday, AOL chief Tim Armstrong apparently fired AOL Patch.com Creative Director Abel Lenz during a conference call with some 1,000 employees listening.

The CEO was explaining changes at Patch that would reduce the number of sites in its local news network from 900 to 600. During the call, according to a number of sources, Armstrong told Lenz

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6 Tips for Dealing With a Passive Boss
6 Tips for Dealing With a Passive Boss

U.S. News and World Report

When you're forced to manage the manager. Your boss's behavior has left you trying to figure out how to best approach him or her on a regular basis. "It puts responsibilities on the employee to best manage that particular boss with that particular personality," says Marilyn Puder-York, a licensed psychologist and author of "The Office Survival Guide."

Take personality into consideration. Before raising the issue with your boss, account for his or her personality. A passive boss isn't necessarily a sensitive one. However, he or she may combine both traits. Whatever the combination, tailor your approach accordingly. "You have to act on a strategy that's going to match who this guy or gal is … and then figure out a script," Puder-York says.

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After an Office Gaffe, Several Ways to Say You're Sorry
After an Office Gaffe, Several Ways to Say You're Sorry

The Wall Street Journal.

The apology needs to be direct and the offender should take full responsibility, says Marilyn Puder-York, Ph.D., a psychologist and executive coach.

It should convey: “I recognize what I did was inappropriate, I recognize it had impact I didn’t intend, no one is blaming the universe or a bad night’s sleep,” she says.

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Astronauts like Kelly train to put feelings aside
Astronauts like Kelly train to put feelings aside

Phys Org

Most people compartmentalize all the time on a smaller scale. But some people are naturally better at putting aside their feelings than others, or they learn how to be better at it.

"They are ultimately super-rational and super-logical," said psychologist and executive coach Marilyn Puder-York, of Old Greenwich, Conn. "They access their emotions, but they don't let their emotions control their cognition or their behavior or their choices."

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How To Deal With Office Politics

Whether it’s a cocktail party or a beer-pong tournament, go. If there’s a group of colleagues traveling to hear a speaker across town, join them. Get other people invested in your career—both inside and outside your office.  “Think of your contacts and political alliances as a bank account,” says Marilyn Puder-York, author of The Office Survival Guide. “Make contributions to it regularly.”

When you come across a nugget of information that’s genuinely useful to a political ally—a colleague, a networking contact, even a superior—use it to build your alliance: “Normally, I don’t share this kind of stuff, but I thought it might help you.” That said, keep a couple of rules in mind. First, don’t initiate negative gossip or pass it along. Second, be wary of relationships built on too much gossip. “Remember,” says Puder-York. “That person who’s gossiping with  you will probably gossip about you too.”

WETFEET
 

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A-Rod Steroid Scandal: NYSPA Psychologist
A-Rod Steroid Scandal: NYSPA Psychologist

Psychologist Marilyn Puder-York, who works with another much-maligned group - Wall Streeters - said Rodriguez had the deck stacked against him before he began speaking. "People are generally resentful of him because of the money he's paid and his inability to help get the team to the World Series," Puder-York said.

So what he said doesn't really matter. "It's what he does now to merit the public's respect that matters," she said.

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Daily News

The Win-Win Way to Play Office Politics
The Win-Win Way to Play Office Politics

These are the negative and stereotypical examples that help give office politics a bad name. Certainly, there are many unethical and unprofessional ways to be political, said Marilyn Puder-York, a psychologist and executive coach based in the New York area and author of “The Office Survival Guide.” When it is done ethically, though, no one loses, and you’ve “enhanced your reputation with the right people,” she said.

To Dr. Puder-York, office politics is a balance between cooperation and competition. There are times when it causes harm and dysfunction, and other times when it motivates and inspires employees, enhancing productivity and creativity, she said.

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The New York Times
Office politics: It's a Minefield Out There
Office politics: It's a Minefield Out There

By Richard Pachter, Knight Ridder

Book Review from the Boston Globe
The Office Survival Guide: Surefire Techniques for Dealing with Challenging People and Situations
Marilyn Puder-York
McGraw Hill

Books on office politics, I must confide, are invariably more entertaining than the authors probably intend, due to the necessity of including a multitude of anecdotes to illuminate the sundry lessons they offer. Author Marilyn Puder-York's tales of woe, replete with colorful characters and unfortunate (but commonplace) circumstances, provide the usual vicarious delights. But she fully explores each option in a wise and real-world way.

A typical case explores the unhappiness of an executive passed over for promotion, despite being amply qualified, according to her self-assessment, which Puder-York does not dispute. She then probes a bit at the executive's other assumptions, revealing her lack of proactive communication with the boss who'd promoted another in her stead. Additionally, the author points out her too-casual workplace wardrobe, which failed to support the image of the role she'd sought.

The larger message is to pay close attention to details that may seem less relevant to the job at hand but are clearly useful in getting the idea across to the boss that one is worthy of advancement.

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How to Cope With a Boss Who Meddles Too Much
How to Cope With a Boss Who Meddles Too Much

"You're not going to change a micromanager's habits overnight," said Marilyn Puder-York, an independent executive coach in New York and the author of "The Office Survival Guide: Surefire Techniques for Dealing With Challenging People and Situations." "Remember that reversing this kind of behavior takes time."

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The New York Times